Five Steps to Recording a Quality Podcast

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By Jacob Bozarth, Resonate Recordings

Podcasting is incredibly popular these days and the trends seem to show it’s not slowing down any time soon. It’s simple to do and usually not very expensive, making it approachable for many types of people. (You can get more information on starting a podcast here. Podbean offers free starter podcast hosting plans and affordable unlimited hosting.) However, podcasting can have a learning curve to it, particularly when it comes to how to record a quality podcast. This is something I deal with on a regular basis, so I understand how important it is to make sure you have a quality recording for your podcast episodes. To help make sure your podcast recording process is simple, effective and offers you the highest quality, consider these 5 easy steps to recording a quality podcast.

1. Select Quality Podcast Recording Equipment

Podcast recording equipment can be a little daunting, especially since there are several different competing voices that recommend different things. How do you know who has the best and right recommendation? We have found the simplest recording setup happens to be the best option for podcasting, and it doesn’t have to break your bank. Here are our top podcast equipment recommendations:

Podcast Microphone: Electro-Voice RE320
○ USB Microphone – Audio-Technica ATR2100-USB/XLR Microphone
● Headphones: Sony MDR 7506
● Podcast Recording Software: Built in Zoom recording software (Zencastr.com if you are planning to record remote)
● Podcast Recording Hardware: Zoom H6 Portable Recorder
Podcast Equipment Accessories:
Cloudlifter Mic Activator
Microphone Cable
Pop Filter
Microphone Stand

2. Record Your Podcast Audio

A quality audio recording is the foundation for a well-produced podcast. Here are some tips for recording your audio to ensure you get the best sound possible out of your recording equipment.

Recording Tip 1 – Choose the right environment

Your recording environment is perhaps the most important element that can make or break the sound of your recording. The majority of podcasts today are self produced, with most not being recorded in a professional studio environment, which means that the environment you create is incredibly important. First, a good recording space must be quiet (no HVAC, fans, etc.). Second, a good recording space has natural sound absorption. For example, carpeted rooms with furniture or walk-in closets are going to work much better than an empty room with bare floors.

Recording Tip 2 – Proper microphone technique

Once you create an ideal environment you need to think about the basics of the actual recording. When recording there are 2 basic things to ensure good microphone technique:

Distance – Most microphones will have what we call a “sweet spot.” This is the distance at which your voice will sound the best on that particular microphone. When recording narration, the distance from your microphone is everything. A good rule of thumb is to stay about 3-5 inches from your microphone.

Positioning – Getting your mic in the correct position is key. Depending on the type of microphone you are using, the difference between 1-2 inches can make all the difference between clear, warm, and articulate narration and hollow, muddy, or unintelligible narration. Once you have your mic at the correct distance you want to ensure that the front of the microphone capsule points directly towards the source (aka: your mouth).

Accessories – In addition to your microphone, we recommend a few accessories that will help prevent common problems when recording. A pop filter is an affordable tool that goes between your mouth and your mic that stop bursts of air that may cause a pop sound in your recording. We also highly recommend using a mic stand or broadcast arm to help enable you to correctly position your mic while also preventing handling noises.

Recording Tip 3 – Monitor recording levels

Gain – Whether you are using an outboard mic preamp, an interface, a handheld recorder, or a usb mic there should be an adjustable gain setting. But once you have found your adjustable gain setting, what is that magic level you should record your narration? A good rule of thumb is to have your mic peak around -10 to -12 dB. This means at the louder parts of your recording the level should go no higher than -10dB. Most recording devices have these numbers listed on a visual meter. However, if your device does not have these numbers listed, try to stay in the green or about halfway up your meter. If you cannot find a visual meter on your device, well this leads us to our next point…

Monitor – It is important that you have a way to monitor and listen to what you are actually recording. Even if your device has an excellent visual meter to check your recording level, we recommend you be a skeptic and never trust your eyes. In our world, you must learn to only trust your ears. For this reason, we recommend someone always monitor your recording with high quality, closed back headphones when recording. Monitoring your audio in real time will enable you to quickly recognize and address any issues with your recording.

3. Master the Art of Remote Recording

The majority of podcasters have some sort of interview on their show, and more often than not these interviews are conducted remotely as opposed to in-person. There is a right and wrong way to record remotely, and we want to help you know the right and best way to capture a quality remote recording.
*if you don’t do remote recordings for your show, feel free to skip on down to #4.*

Hands down, the 2 best tools to help you capture a quality remote recording are Zencastr and a Zoom H6. We have created in-depth tutorials on how to use Zencastr and the Zoom H6 on our website, but here’s the basics of what you need to know:

Computer to Computer – There are many great options out there for recording a computer to computer remote recordings. In these situations you and your guest will connect, hear each other, and record through a web based audio recording application. The two platforms that we recommend for this are Zencastr and Squadcast. Both of these platforms are designed to record high quality audio and many of our clients use these platforms to do just that. You can also find a detailed review and tutorial of Zencastr here. Squadcast is a newer platform but unlike Zencastr it has a video feature so you and your guest can see each other while recording. If you are have used a video communication platform such as Skype, Zoom, or GoToMeeting you might like the video feature that Squadcast offers.

Double Ender – In this case you and your guest will record each end of the audio locally. Many well known interview style podcasts use this setup and to be honest this is the way to record to capture the highest quality audio for a remote recording. You can record your audio locally to your computer, a DAW, or a handheld recorder. When I get interview requests to record for a podcast, I use the following setup to record the audio on my end: Skype or a phone call to only hear the host, a RE20 Microphone, into a Cloudlifter CL-1, into a Zoom H6 handheld recorder. Once we are done recording the interview, I will upload my track recorded locally on the Zoom H6 to the host or producer so they can edit and mix my track with the hosts for the episode.

Phone Call Recording – There are many apps out there that claim to be a high quality call recorder. In our experience, here is the best way to record high quality (if that exists) phone recordings:
Use a H6 or H5 handheld recorder, along with this cable to plug into the ⅛ output of your smartphone, and the ¼ end into the combo input on the handheld recorder, a microphone for your vocals and a pair of headphones. If you would like to see a sample video of this setup explained and used you can check out this post.

4. Post Production Part 1 – Podcast Editing

Editing your podcast is probably the most tedious and time consuming part of the post production process, but it is an essential step nonetheless if you want a high quality show that will retain listeners. Here are our top 5 tips for editing your podcast. (For more editing tips and techniques, you can check out this resource on podcast editing tricks parts 1 and part 2.)

Podcast Editing Tip 1: Watch your tone

One of the biggest editing mistakes is when there is a sudden shift in tone of the voice. Editing together two different segments of audio or merging different sentences together can be tricky. Not only can there be a change in the tone of the voice, but also a change in volume and a change in background noise or room tone. Another thing to listen for is room reverberation and echo. Sudden cuts at the end of phrases can prevent the natural room reverberation, so it’s best to listen for the end of the “room decay” before making an edit or cut.

Podcast Editing Tip 2: Just Breathe

Another common mistake is cutting off breaths too abruptly or missing breaths all together when making an edit. Cut off breaths occur when a breath is chopped off or incomplete. Missing breaths occur when a breath is edited out due to two different segments being put together. Double breaths can also be a problem when editing. This happens when there are two breaths back to back. All of these errors cause the dialogue to sound unnatural and choppy. When looking at audio waveforms, breaths can be difficult to spot because they are so much lower in volume compared to other parts of dialogue. To make it easier to spot breaths we recommend increasing the size of the waveforms in your DAW.

Podcast Editing Tip 3: Copy/Paste Quality Consonants and Breaths

Sometimes there will be certain consonants and breaths that are problematic and just don’t sound good. For example, a plosive (‘P’ sound) is typically caused by the host being too close to the microphone and by moving too much air through the diaphragm of the microphone. An effective fix to this problem is to copy and paste another ‘P’ sound that isn’t popped and sounds more natural over the problematic area. This is very tedious, but it makes a huge difference in the overall quality of the finished product.

Podcast Editing Tip 4: Remove Lip Smacks/Clicks

Do you ever get annoyed by hearing a continuous barrage of lip smacks? We sure do, and nothing can be more annoying than hearing a lip smack every other sentence. While lip smacks are a natural part of some people’s speech patterns, going through the work of editing out lip smacks and mouth clicks will make your podcast a more pleasant listen. In the end your audience will thank you!

Podcast Editing Tip 5: Use Headphones

One of the most useful tips when editing is to use good quality headphones. Over the ear, closed headphones work great to help isolate you from your editing environment. Listening on headphones will help you hear all of the details and nuances of the voice much better than listening on computer speakers or even on higher quality near-field monitors. This makes hearing subtle details such as breaths much easier.

Now you’ve captured a high quality audio recording and edited out the distractions, you’re ready to finalize your show to go live!

5. Post Production Part 2 – Mixing & Mastering

Having a well edited show is just one part of having a quality podcast. Too often we come across a podcasts that have great and very desirable content, but the audio quality is so bad that we have to turn it off. Sometimes it’s a podcast where one voice is loud and the other is soft; sometimes it’s a distorted, echoey, or noisey dialogue track; sometimes the audio is so “muddy” it seems like the host recorded the show underwater…the list goes on and on. More often than not we hear audio issues that could be reduced and often eliminated had the show been properly mixed and mastered.

Mixing is the post-production process where individual tracks for the podcast are improved and enhanced, so the final presentation sounds great. Mastering is the process of ensuring the overall levels are consistent throughout the episode and making sure the average loudness standard for the episode is met. When podcast mixing and mastering is done well, you provide a distraction free and enjoyable experience for the listener. When this is not done well, listeners are distracted by the poor audio quality of the show and many listeners will quit listening to the podcast.

When mixing and mastering is done properly, the quality of the show goes unnoticed by the listener — which is the best result you can hope for. Proper mixing and mastering allows your listener to enjoy the content of the podcast undistracted by audio issues. Once your podcast has been edited, mixed, and masterd you should export your audio to share with the world as a stereo MP3 file. We recommend your final file to upload to your hosting platform be a Stereo, 128 kbps, 44.1kHz MP3 file. This will ensure the final product is a high quality audio file that is broadcast ready.

Podcasting is a great way of expressing your message for the world to hear. It’s a great creative outlet, an effective marketing strategy and a very approachable way of getting your voice heard by others. No doubt it will take a little work to create a great podcast that people will enjoy, but rest assured that it is possible! By doing a little homework to make sure your recording equipment selection is right, your recording environment is distraction-free and your post-production is on point you can have confidence that your end result will be a podcast that people will love.

About the Author

Jacob Bozarth is the co-founder and CEO of Resonate Recordings. They partner with podcasters, companies, and entrepreneurs to make podcasting easy. Their in-house team of audio engineers provides professional editing, mixing, and mastering for over 200 podcasts. Sign up through this link for 2 free episodes with Resonate Recordings (1 before you pay, and 1 when once you get 20 episode credits or more) You can connect with him at:

Website | Twitter | Instagram | LinkedIn | Facebook | Email

If you have any questions or need any support with anything discussed here, feel free to reach out the Resonate Recordings team.

For questions about podcast hosting or how Podbean can help you, contact the Podbean Support team.

The Best Way to Promote Your Podcast

The Best Way to Promote Your Podcast

There are a million ways to promote your podcast. Some are effective, while others might be a waste of time (and money). And, of course, what works is dependent on “where your audience is”. This is why promoting on other podcasts might just be the best way to grow your audience.

Why is podcast cross-promotion one of the most effective podcast marketing strategies?

  • Podcast listeners already know how to listen to podcasts, which removes one big hurdle you may encounter when you promote elsewhere.
  • Listeners love content suggestions. This type of marketing comes across as helpful information and listeners pay attention.
  • You can target listeners who already like similar categories of shows. This solution brings you right to where your potential audience is.
  • They can subscribe/download your show right away. They’re in the midst of listening, so it’s not something they have to remember to do later.

Why use PodAds to promote a podcast?

Cross-promotion is effective. A lot of podcasters are already doing it. We see many discussions about it in Facebook groups and hear the promo spots often. However, it takes a lot of time to set this up (networking, contacting podcasters, sending your promo, discussing details..and typically, arranging and running the other podcaster’s promo on your show). With PodAds, you can have promo spots running within minutes. Yes, you’ll need to spend some money. But, you’ll save valuable time. You can also reach a broader range of listeners than it might be possible to get via personal connections.

Fortunately, you can set a daily budget cap so you don’t have to spend a lot. You can view your analytics to see just how your ads are delivering. And, you can modify, pause or stop your campaigns at any time.

If you’re spending any money on Facebook ads or other promotions (or considering it), take a look at PodAds first. Podcasters tend to get a much higher return on investment (ROI) from these campaigns.

How to Use PodAds: Three Simple Steps

  • Sign up as an advertiser: https://sponsorship.podbean.com/. If you’re already signed up to receive ads on your podcast, you’ll need to create an account with a different email address.
  • Create your campaign. Provide basic information (contact info, website, description, copy), set your budget and start date. Select categories (and geographies, if desired). Pick ad slots and set pricing. Upload your audio file. Add your payment method.
  • Run and manage your campaign. Once approved, your ads till begin running within 24 hours of your start date. You can review the list of podcasts and remove any of them at any time. Check your campaign’s results as it progresses: see impressions and amount spent. Pause or cancel campaigns whenever you want.

Sign up for PodAds today and give it a try! You can set a daily budget cap of as little as $10 (that’s the cap, often the actual spending will be less depending on your specs). Check out our Advertiser FAQs here or contact us if you have questions.

You can also sign up your podcast to receive ad revenue. Learn more here.

What Are Some Best Practices When Starting a Podcast?

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Podcasts continue to explode in popularity. 124 million Americans have listened to a podcast, and 28% (or 73 million) listen monthly. The number of weekly podcast listeners is up by 6 million from 2017. There’s a low barrier to starting a podcast and getting it distributed. But, that doesn’t mean podcasting doesn’t require effort. Along with the explosion in podcast popularity, listeners now have thousands of choices. Your podcast needs to deliver quality content and value. Here are seven best practices to consider if you’re starting a podcast.

1. Think about what you want to say and why.

There’s a lot of content for people to consume, in all forms. What makes your podcast unique? Who do you imagine listening to it? Is there a gap you’ve found or a niche you want to fill? Do a little homework. Check out similar or related shows (bookmark them for the future, there might be some ways to collaborate). What’s missing? What special perspective will you bring that people can’t find elsewhere? What tone do you want for your show?

2. Make every second count.

Listeners’ time is valuable. Keep content concise. This doesn’t mean there’s a magic number. Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History is one of the most popular podcasts, and it sometimes runs more than four hours. But, that’s a rare exception. And, he packs his episodes with high quality, engaging content. The nature of your podcast might lend itself to some “chit chat”, but think about the value the listener is getting for the time they’re spending.

3. Plan your episodes.

Listen to some top quality shows. For every minute you hear, they likely spent hours researching and preparing. Not all shows take the investigative journalism of a Serial. But, sometimes podcasters forget about the importance of planning since it can feel like having a casual conversation. Planning might include determining show topics, contacting guests (and preparing them), thinking about your questions or a rough outline (or script) of what you want to cover, and doing any research.

4. Set things up for searchability.

In podcast apps, your podcast and episode titles are they key to being found (along with the author tag in some), and helps listeners easily identify what your content is about. So, think about keywords your audience might search for when coming up with titles.

This is also where show notes and transcripts come in handy. Search engines crawl text, so your episode descriptions and show notes should be search-friendly. Descriptions and show notes (think a blog post that accompanies a podcast) also serve as a place for listeners (or someone who finds your show online) to see a summary and get more information, links, etc.

5. Distribute, share, promote!

Set up your podcast with a reliable podcast host and get an RSS feed…and you’re set to distribute to the many places people listen. Apple Podcasts (formerly known as iTunes) is the biggest directory so that should be a top priority. You can also make sure your show is set up properly for Google and that they index your show for Google Podcasts. Many podcast apps will pick your show up from iTunes, but there are also many directories where you can submit. Here’s a good list of podcast directories to check out. The good news is that due to the magic of RSS feeds, you just submit your feed and then your episodes will automatically update in various directories and apps.

Some podcast hosts make social sharing easy with automated tools in their platforms. You also want to have an online “home” for your podcast, whether that be within an existing website, a new WordPress or Squarespace site or a podcast site provided by your hosting company. This is the place where people can read your show notes* and get more information…and there are many other ways you can use this space, especially as your podcast grows and evolves. There are different ways you can integrate your RSS feed with different types of websites, depending on where you host your podcast and what you want to do. You can embed podcast episodes easily with a player so people can also listen online.

Getting listed in directories and set up online is the first step, but you’ll need to do most of the heavy lifting to promote your show. Think about where your potential listeners “hang out” online. Are they on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram? Can you draw people in from Youtube (some podcast hosting companies autopost an “audiogram” there for you or you can get tools to do this)? Are there specific forums or blogs where you can share information and generate interest? You might also want to consider promoting on other podcasts. It can be one of the most effective ways to gain new listeners.
6.Get a handle on audio production.

If your podcast sounds bad, people will tune out. Learn some basic audio tools, such as audio editing software. There are free tools like Audacity that can work fine for podcast editing. You also don’t have to spend a lot on microphones. But, check out suggestions from other podcasters and podcast experts (Facebook groups like Podcasting Smarter are one good source).

There are even options to record right from your phone and there are some decent sounding podcasts out there just using their earbuds (check out the Podbean app for recording and publishing, for example). Reducing background noise makes a big difference, so be sure you have a quiet space or add some soundproofing (egg crating foam, carpeting and blankets all do the trick on the cheap).

Another option to consider is hiring pros for certain aspects of production. There are tons of resources out there, from professional sound studios to editors, guest bookers, show note writers and full production teams.

7. Measure your success by your own benchmarks. And, make changes as needed.

Your podcast hosting company will provide download statistics and various data you can track. It can be hard to know what good numbers are. It is not the same for a highly produced true crime show as a podcast about a specific type of knitting. Don’t only use numbers to measure your success. Think beforehand about your goals and measure your success against that. Perhaps you want to use podcasting to showcase your expertise and build trust with potential clients. Maybe you only get 100 downloads/episode, but you have loyal client listeners and have had several inquiries. That’d be a success for you!

Don’t be afraid to make changes. If you feel something isn’t working or get feedback from listeners, you can adapt. Most podcasts evolve in some way over time. Some do a complete rebrand, change formats or end and start a completely new show. Always go back to your goals (even if the goal is for you and your best friend to get together and chat every week…if that’s happening and you’re enjoying it, podcasting has worked for you). Evaluate how things are working and change what’s not.

Most importantly, don’t get bogged down in the details or halted by perfection. With these best practices, you can prioritize what you need to do when starting a podcast. Get started and take advantage of the growing podcasting wave. Check out all that Podbean has to offer and try it out with a free month at Podbean.com.

How to Get Your Podcast File URL

If you want to embed your podcast into other sites such as WordPress, Blogspot, etc. you may need to get the URLs of your audio or video files in Podbean.

To get the URLs of your uploaded files, go to “Publish” -> “Media Manager”. From there just click on the file name desired, and you’ll get a pop up window showing the URL. You can copy and paste this as needed.

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You may also want to read more about:

Embeddable Players

Social Sharing and Direct Share to WordPress via Plugin

Migrating Your Podcast from SoundCloud to Podbean

Migrating from SoundCloud to Podbean is an easy process. With Podbean’s affordable unlimited hosting plans loaded with tons of great features and benefits, it’s a smart move! Podbean has been supporting podcasters for over 10 years. We’re dedicated to providing the best tools and services for our podcasting community.

Step 1: Import your SoundCloud feed into Podbean.

Get your RSS feed in SoundCloud (see “RSS feed” on your content settings page and copy).

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In your Podbean account, under “Publish”→”Episodes”, click on “Import RSS”. Then, paste your SoundCloud RSS feed URL and click the “Import” button.

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Note: The podcast contents will be imported first and the system will show a pop-up message when the contents are successfully imported. Then the system will import the audio and video files. It will take from 15 minutes to few hours to import them based on the size of all the media files. The system will notify you as to whether all the media files have been imported or only parts of them. If there are some media files that cannot be imported, you’ll need to upload them manually and then attach them to the respective episodes.

Step 2: Redirect your SoundCloud feed to your new Podbean feed.

In your SoundCloud account, input your Podbean feed in the “Subscriber Redirect” field.

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Step 3: Turn on the iTunes new feed URL tag in your Podbean account.

Log in to your Podbean account and go to the ‘Settings’->’Feed/iTunes’ page. Scroll down the page, turn on the “iTunes:new-feed-url”, then click the “Update Options” button to save your changes.

Step 4: Update your feed information in iTunes.

Here is the Podcasts Connect Help article on updating your RSS (follow the steps under “to change your RSS feed URL”).

If you have any questions or need more information, please contact the Podbean Support team at http://help.podbean.com/support/home.

Total Podcast Feed Portability: Podbean Offers Permanent Feed

Podbean offers full flexibility for podcasters who decide to migrate their podcast. You don’t have to worry about moving your podcast hosting and dealing with changing feeds, losing subscribers, and all the other headaches. We doubt you’ll ever want to leave Podbean’s hosting platform, but you can be reassured that if you do so your feed will always be available and can be redirected permanently.

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Podbean offers a permanent podcast feed and portability so you can podcast with no worries. Here are the steps to redirect your Podbean feed to a new feed. Contact support.podbean.com if you have any questions.

How to Submit a Podcast to Google Play

Podcasts are now available (released in the U.S. and Canada currently) on Google Play Music. You can submit your Podbean-hosted audio podcasts so you can be found there! Go to Google Play to submit your RSS feed. You will need to 1. Add your RSS feed, 2. Confirm ownership, and 3. Publish.

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You need to have at least 1 episode published and have the appropriate tags set up in Podbean:, or , and or (Podbean supports the iTunes tags, which work for both iTunes and Google Play). Login to google and “add a podcast”. If you don’t know your RSS, simply go to Settings→Feed/iTunes in your Podbean dashboard. At the top you will see “Your RSS feed” (http://yourname.podbean.com/feed/).

After submitting your RSS feed, you will need to “confirm email” (via the email in the RSS feed). Check for the email from Google and click on the “verify ownership” button (or use the code provided if the direct link doesn’t work). You will then be brought to a page to review the information pulled from your RSS feed. Check your artwork, title, description, and episodes there to confirm and click “publish podcast”.

Your show is now submitted and will be reviewed. You will receive an approval or rejection notice to the associated email address. If you have any problems, contact Podbean support for additional help.

How to Manage Multiple Podcasts in One Podbean Account

In Podbean, we refer to different podcasts (sites/feeds) as channels. If you have a network podcast account (Podbean’s Network Plan), you can easily manage multiple channels in one account. To do so, follow these steps:

Step 1: Log into your Network account. Click the “Channels” tab in “My Dashboard” page. Enter the podcast subdomain. Click the “Create a new channel” icon to add the podcast as your channel.

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Step 2: Click the “Manage” button: you’ll be redirected to your new channel to publish.

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*See Podbean plan pricing for all podcast hosting plan options. Podbean no longer offers a network plan, but our Business accounts also offer multiple channels and other custom features; please contact Podbean for pricing and specs.

 

How to Set Up a Private Podcast

It’s easy to set up a private (protected, only for permitted members) podcast in Podbean. Once you have created a business account and have completed your organization page, you can set up a private podcast in three steps:

Step 1: Set up your private podcast channel(s)

Login to your Podbean dashboard. Click on “Channels”. To create a new channel, click “Add a Channel”. Enter the subdomain and choose whether the channel is public or private (note: private channels cannot be changed to public).

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To change a public channel to private, click the open lock icon. You will receive a pop up confirming that you wish to change this channel to private (you cannot change it back).

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Step 2: Add private members

In the “Private” page, you can manually add private members by entering their email addresses or you can add private members in a batch by uploading a .txt file with one email per line. (You can click the i icon next to the “Batch add members” button to get a sample .txt file.)

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Step 3: Publish an episode

Please make sure the “Private” option is checked when you publish the episode.

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After following these three steps, your private podcast channel is online and ready for your private members to access and play your content.

Your private members can access your private podcast via your Podbean site or using the Podbean Podcast app. Please note that your private podcast is not searchable or available for public access in the Podbean site and Podbean app. Your podcast will only be available to your private members who log into the Podbean site or Podbean Podcast App with their email and password (they will receive an email with this information after you add them as private members).

*Other authentication options such as SSO are available for custom enterprise users. Please inquire about pricing and setup.

How do I get my podcast added into the Podbean Podcast App and Podbean Podcast Directory?

Podbean runs a podcast directory online, as well as a having popular Android and iPhone podcast apps. Like most podcatchers, apps, and directories, we pull many public RSS feeds in so that listeners can find your show when they listen online or using our apps.

Listen/download stats will show up in your statistics from your podcast host (if they offer this service). If you are not listed in the directory/app and wish to be, it is easy to submit your podcast. If you are listed, it is also easy to claim ownership (this is also the 1st step if you would like to participate in our monetization platforms such as crowdfunding or advertising, which are both open to all podcasters no matter where you’re hosted).

If for some reason you don’t wish to be included, you can contact us at http://support.podbean.com to request removal, but please note that this means no listeners will be able to find/listen to your podcast when using the Podbean app.